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Tuesday, 26 October 2021 00:00

Although plantar fasciitis is the most common culprit behind heel pain, a burning pain in your heels may indicate nerve damage. There are several conditions that can make the heels feel like they are on fire. Diabetic neuropathy, which is associated with high blood sugar levels, can cause burning pain, as well as sharp or shooting pain, hypersensitivity to touch, and even balance problems. Physical traumas or injuries to the heels can also cause burning pain. Look at your heels for overt signs of injury, such as swelling or bruising. Less common reasons why your heels might be burning include autoimmune diseases, infections, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. If you are suffering from burning heel pain, please seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Roy Rothman, DPM of Florida. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in DeBary, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 19 October 2021 00:00

The ankle joint is a complex structure that connects the foot with the lower part of the leg, and allows your foot to move up and down. The bones in the ankle include the talus (in the lower part of the joint), as well as the tibia and fibula bones (in the leg). The ankle also includes ligaments that support and hold the ankle together, as well as cartilage, muscles, and tendons. Ankle pain can be caused by a variety of conditions including sprains, strains, injuries, Achilles tendonitis, and various forms of arthritis. Along with pain, these conditions may also cause swelling, bruising, tingles, or numbness, redness, weakness, and stiffness in the ankle. It may even be difficult or impossible to apply weight to the ankle or walk. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, make an appointment with a podiatrist for a thorough examination to determine the root cause of your discomfort, and to receive proper treatment.

Ankle pain can be caused by a number of problems and may be potentially serious. If you have ankle pain, consult with Roy Rothman, DPM from Florida. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Ankle pain is any condition that causes pain in the ankle. Due to the fact that the ankle consists of tendons, muscles, bones, and ligaments, ankle pain can come from a number of different conditions.

Causes

The most common causes of ankle pain include:

  • Types of arthritis (rheumatoid, osteoarthritis, and gout)
  • Ankle sprains
  • Broken ankles
  • Achilles tendinitis
  • Achilles tendon rupture
  • Stress fractures
  • Bursitis
  • Tarsal tunnel syndrome
  • Plantar fasciitis

Symptoms

Symptoms of ankle injury vary based upon the condition. Pain may include general pain and discomfort, swelling, aching, redness, bruising, burning or stabbing sensations, and/or loss of sensation.

Diagnosis

Due to the wide variety of potential causes of ankle pain, podiatrists will utilize a number of different methods to properly diagnose ankle pain. This can include asking for personal and family medical histories and of any recent injuries. Further diagnosis may include sensation tests, a physical examination, and potentially x-rays or other imaging tests.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are rest, ice packs, keeping pressure off the foot, orthotics and braces, medication for inflammation and pain, and surgery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in DeBary, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Tuesday, 12 October 2021 00:00

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) causes a narrowing of arteries in the limbs that are not close to the center of the body, such as the legs and feet. These arteries, which carry blood from the heart, become blocked by a buildup of plaque and cannot deliver adequate blood supply to muscles and tissues. This can result in muscle cramping while exercising (claudication) that does not go away after you stop. You may also experience slow-healing foot wounds and slower growth of leg hair and toenails. The skin on your legs may also have a shiny appearance. PAD is potentially dangerous because it increases the risk of a heart attack or stroke. Also, tissue which does not receive enough blood can become infected or die (gangrene) which, left untreated, may lead to a life-threatening blood infection called sepsis. It is important to pay attention and see a podiatrist if your body gives you any warning signs of PAD.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Roy Rothman, DPM from Florida. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in DeBary, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 05 October 2021 00:00

A bunionectomy is a surgical procedure that is used to remove a bunion and bring the big toe (and any other affected structures in the foot) back into proper alignment. During the surgery, anesthesia is used to numb your foot. The surgeon then makes one or more incisions near the bunion to remove extra bone or tissue, realign the bones, or straighten the toe. In some cases, the toe joint may be operated on to rebuild or repair it. Bunionectomies are typically outpatient procedures, which means that you will get to go home the same day as your surgery. You may be given a toe spacer, post-surgical shoe, or mobility device to help hold your foot in the right position and keep weight off of it while you heal. It can take several months to fully recover. To learn more about bunion surgery and to find out if it’s the right treatment for you, please speak with a podiatrist. 

If you are suffering from bunions, contact Roy Rothman, DPM of Florida. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

A bunion is formed of swollen tissue or an enlargement of boney growth, usually located at the base joint of the toe that connects to the foot. The swelling occurs due to the bones in the big toe shifting inward, which impacts the other toes of the foot. This causes the area around the base of the big toe to become inflamed and painful.

Why Do Bunions Form?

Genetics – Susceptibility to bunions are often hereditary

Stress on the feet – Poorly fitted and uncomfortable footwear that places stress on feet, such as heels, can worsen existing bunions

How Are Bunions Diagnosed?

Doctors often perform two tests – blood tests and x-rays – when trying to diagnose bunions, especially in the early stages of development. Blood tests help determine if the foot pain is being caused by something else, such as arthritis, while x-rays provide a clear picture of your bone structure to your doctor.

How Are Bunions Treated?

  • Refrain from wearing heels or similar shoes that cause discomfort
  • Select wider shoes that can provide more comfort and reduce pain
  • Anti-inflammatory and pain management drugs
  • Orthotics or foot inserts
  • Surgery

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in DeBary, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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